menu +

News ed eventi recenti


8 q

Ingredients for 4/6 persons
Modica chocolate, 70% pure
mango, pineapples, kiwi, strawberries and melon
as an alternative: papaya, banana, apple and kiwis

Clean the fruit you have chosen and cut it into squares. Prepare the skewers, alternating the various types of fruit on the basis of their color. Melt the Modica chocolate and pour it slowly over the skewers.

8 q

Ingredients for 4/6 persons
6 shrimps
6 baby cuttlefish
1 pineapple
1 kiwi
1 mango
1 lemon
mustard
extra-virgin olive oil
salt and pepper

 

Peel all the fruit and let it marinate in the juice of the lemon for a short period of time. Clean the fish and roast them on a hotplate. Prepare the skewer, alternating pieces of fruit and fish. Season with the extra-virgin olive oil and the mustard and serve.

8 q

Ingredients for 4/6 persons
assorted goat cheeses
ginger and apple marmalade
extra-virgin olive oil

Arrange the goat cheese on a serving board and season with extra-virgin olive oil and the ginger and apple marmalade.

8 q

Ingredients for 4 persons
7 pinces of pre-cooked cous cous
the juice of an orange
cloves
raisins
almonds and nuts
olive oil
a cinnamon stick
star anise
honey
butter

Steep the raisins in warm water. Prepare the pre-cooked cous-cous and separate the grains with a fork to insure they don’t stick together. Heat the orange juice with the spices, toast the almonds and pine nuts, and add a bit of butter. Emulsify the olive oil and honey. Filter the orange juice and pour it over the couscous and add the nuts and raisins. At the end, add the honey and olive oil sauce.

8 q

Do you hear ‘Pecorino’ and think cheese? It’s also the name of a grape that makes some terrific wines. Our wine columnist shares some intel on obscure varieties winemakers love

HOW CAN SOMETHING commonplace also be obscure? This would seem to defy logic, and yet many grape varieties key to the world’s wine producers remain a mystery to most oenophiles. These grapes may not be household names like Merlot or Cabernet, but they’re responsible for some very solid, very drinkable and occasionally even great wines. I consider the following grapes particularly deserving of a bit of acclaim.

[…] FRAPPATO

Despite a name that sounds like a fast-paced dance, the Frappato grape has been slow to gain fame outside its native Sicily. Much like Bonarda, this red grape is beloved by local winemakers but little known to the world at large. It’s not always easy to find in stores.
One Frappato producer who stands out, in terms of both quality and production numbers: Valle dell’Acate. According to proprietor Gaetana Jacono, the Frappato grape was the source of the very first wine her family produced back in the late 19th century and was once the sole grape in the family’s Cerasuolo di Vittoria wines. Today their Cerasuolo wines contain a blend of Frappato and the much better known Nero d’Avola grape.
Ms. Jacono loves the fresh character and bright acidity of Frappato, which she said can even pair well with seafood such as salmon, tuna and fish soup with mussels. This grape is as versatile—light and lively with a delightful bitter-cherry aroma—as it is easy to love.

DISPLAY THE FULL ARTICLE

 

 

8 q

valle dell'acateWe received a bottle of Il Frappato wine to review from the Valle dell’Acate winery in the southeaster part of Sicily. It was suggested that we chill the wine and enjoy on a hot summer day. We tend to drink more white and rosé wines during the heat of the summer; however, this red wine was delicious served cold. The wine was made from the Frappato grape, native to Sicily. We have had Sicilian wines before made with the red Nero d’Avola grape and the white Grillo grape; this was our first taste of a wine made with Frappato.
The 2017 Il Frappato Vittoria Frappato DOC Sicily had a translucent dark red color with 13% alcohol. There were floral and red fruits on the aroma. The taste was reminiscent of violets, cherries, juicy black raspberries and baking spices. The medium bodied wine had mild tannins. The finish was crisp with fruit yielding to spices.
The Valle dell’Acate winery has a series of wines from the “7 Soils for 7 Wines” portfolio. This Frappato was made with grapes from the “black soil with white pebbles” vineyard. This vineyard is about 100 meters (328 feet) above sea level. The compact soil has a black color with white stones throughout. Grape vines are deep rooted.

Read more…

8 q

by Sarah Tracey

Because warm weather isn’t only about rosé.

Temperatures are rising but that doesn’t mean you have to switch to rosé. Red wines still deserve a place on your table, whether that table is indoors or out. The most refreshing way to make red wine a part of your summer routine is to chill it. Not all red wines should be chilled, though: Chilling full-bodied, high tannin, high-alcohol reds like cabernet sauvignon will make them taste astringent and metallic; and savory wines like syrah that have lots of leathery, earthy, or spicy flavors will not drink well when chilled. The best red wines to chill are naturally light in body, low in tannins (the compound found in the seeds, stems, and skins of grapes that can make your mouth feel dry and prickly), and are fruity. Chilling reds like these brings out their liveliness and minimizes the perception of alcohol. (That’s the warming sensation that alcohol in wine can bring and it’s not something we usually desire when it’s hot out!).
The best way to chill a bottle of red for summer sipping? In an ice bucket or cooler. If you can’t tuck the bottle into ice, simply put it in your refrigerator for 45-60 minutes before you plan to drink it. Here, five red wines that are perfect chilled.

[…] FRAPPATO
A fantastic, easy drinking wine from Sicily, frappato is brimming with wild strawberry and red raspberry flavors and aromas, and has an incredibly smooth texture. Try Try Tami By Occhipinti Frappato 2017 ($21.99) or Il Frappato, Valle dell’Acate 2017 ($19.99). Embrace the spirit of Italy in the summertime by pairing a chilled glass of frappato with a fresh summer pasta.

DISPLAY THE FULL ARTICLE
MARTHA STEWARD.COM

8 q

1500 km away, in Sicily’s south-east, Gaetana Jacono runs the Valle dell’Acate winery. She is bringing to six generations of wine making tradition new production technologies and distribution approaches that are developing exports to large new markets.

Enterprises like Brembo and Valle dell’Acate have helped Italy in recent years gradually recover from its extended recession. These are mostly medium sized enterprises that are highly productive and have grown activity and created jobs though investment and exports, supported by government policies such as the Industry 4.0 programme or labour market and education reforms.

OECD ECOSCOPE
by Mauro Pisu and Tim Bulman,
Italy Desk, OECD Economics Department

8 q

by Mauro Pisu and Tim Bulman
Italy Desk, OECD Economics Department

In Curno, 50 km north east of Milan, is the headquarters of Brembo, the Italian company supplying brakes for Teslas and Ferraris as well as for mass market cars and motorcycles. Founded in 1961, its 255 employees generate over USD 3 billion of revenue from production facilities across 15 countries.
1500 km away, in Sicily’s south-east, Gaetana Jacono runs the Valle dell’Acate winery. She is bringing to six generations of wine making tradition new production technologies and distribution approaches that are developing exports to large new markets.
Enterprises like Brembo and Valle dell’Acate have helped Italy in recent years gradually recover from its extended recession. These are mostly medium sized enterprises that are highly productive and have grown activity and created jobs though investment and exports, supported by government policies such as the Industry 4.0 programme or labour market and education reforms.

DISPLAY THE FULL ARTICLE
OECD ECOSCOPE

Vinitaly will offer us the opportunity to present our wines, new vintages and and the novelty: IRI DA IRI.

From 7 to 10 April you can find us at Vinitaly 2019.

Our stand | Hall 2 Sicily .  Stand 64 D

torna su